Dating antique glass bottles

A few examples of marks would be “I inside a diamond”, “OWENS”, “B in a circle” , “K in a hexagon” and “N in a square”.Please click here which will take you to the first page with more introductory information and explanatory comments: GLASS BOTTLE MARKS.Dating antique bottles requires knowledge of the evolution of bottle technology and the ability to research manufacturers and bottling companies.Although glass bottles have been made for a few thousand years, it was not until the 19th century that bottle use became common, coinciding with the industrial revolution. The earliest bottles were hand-blown by a glassblower with a blowpipe and lack seams.: Although some collectors and researchers may consider this an “obvious” question, it’s not quite as simple as that. Who was the last person who used it and handled it before it came into your possession?

dating antique glass bottles-16

The Owens machine revolutionized the bottle industry.the general inside environment could be, and often was, brutal.It was extremely hot (especially in the warmer months), noisy, and dangerous for a number or reasons.Every glass object, even the most lowly, commonplace glass bottle, has a story behind it, although all of the precise details may never be known. What was the name of the company or factory where it was produced? Is it American-made, or a piece that was produced outside the United States?Can the company / maker be identified by the markings on it? All of these questions might come to mind to the collector or layman, flea market shopper, historian, archaeologist, or casual hobbyist……….. I’m interested in the general history of the glass manufacturing industry in the United States, especially within the sphere of container glass, electrical insulators and tableware (both pressed and blown).


Leave a Reply